WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

USDA recently revised the CACFP meal patterns to ensure children and infants have access to healthy, balanced meals throughout the day. Under the updated child and adult meal patterns, meals served will include a greater variety of vegetables and fruit, more whole grains, and less added sugar and saturated fat. The changes to the infant meal pattern support breastfeeding and the consumption of vegetables and fruit without added sugars. CACFP centers and day care homes must comply with the updated meal patterns by October 1, 2017.

Our Daily Bread of Tennessee is here to assist you during the transition to the new meal patter requirements! With the help of the USDA, TeamNutrition and the National CACFP Sponsors Association, we have created the following resources to help you better understand the meal pattern changes and how to best implement them at your child care site.

Where Do I Start?

1.) TOP 9 MEAL PATTERN CHANGES
2.) REGISTER FOR IN-PERSON TRAINING
3.) USE ADDITIONAL TOOLS
1.) TOP 9 MEAL PATTERN CHANGES

Read the “TOP 9 CHANGES TO THE CACFP MEAL PATTERN” section below. These digital flash cards will provide you with a quick overview of the major updates.

2.) REGISTER FOR IN-PERSON TRAINING

Register for the 2018 training sessions held throughout the state of Tennessee. Registration is 100% FREE for ODBTN sponsored child care sites.

3.) USE ADDITIONAL TOOLS

Download additional tools and print-outs near the bottom of this page.

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Start Here

These are the 9 major changes to the CACFP meal pattern requirements. This will give you an at-a-glance view of some of improvements made to the meal patterns.

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- TOP 9 -

Changes to the (CACFP) Meal Pattern Requirements

#1

Greater Variety of Vegetables and Fruits

The combined fruit and vegetable component is now a separate vegetable component and a separate fruit component; and

Juice is limited to once per day.

#2

More Whole Grains

At least one serving of grains per day must be whole grain-rich;

Grain-based desserts no longer count towards the grain component; and

Ounce equivalents (oz eq) are used to determine the amount of creditable grains.

#3

More Protein Options

Meat and meat alternates may be served in place of the entire grains component at breakfast a maximum of three times per week; and

Tofu counts as a meat alternate.

#4

Age Appropriate Meals

A new age group to address the needs of older children 13 through 18 years old.

#5

Less Added Sugar

Yogurt must contain no more than 23 grams of sugar per 6 ounces; and

Breakfast cereals must contain no more than 6 grams of sugar per dry ounce.

#6

Making Every Sip Count

Unflavored whole milk must be served to 1 year olds; unflavored low-fat or fat-free milk must be served to children 2 through 5 years old; and unflavored low-fat, unflavored fat-free, or flavored fat-free milk must be served to children 6 years old and older.

#7

Encourage and Support Breastfeeding

Providers may receive reimbursement for meals when a breastfeeding mother comes to the day care center or home and directly breastfeeds her infant.

Only breastmilk and infant formula are served to infants 0 through 5 month.

#8

Developmentally Appropriate Infant Meals:

Two age groups, instead of three: 0 through 5 month olds and 6 through 11 month olds; and

Solid foods are gradually introduced around 6 months of age, as developmentally appropriate.

#9

More Nutritious
Infant Meals

Requires a vegetable or fruit, or both, to be served at snack for infants 6 through 11 months old;

No longer allows juice or cheese food or cheese spread to be served; and

Allows ready-to-eat cereals at snack.

Additional Improvements:

• Extends offer versus serve to at-risk after-school programs; and
• Frying is not allowed as a way of preparing foods on-site.

TOOLS:

february, 2020

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